May 19, 2014
fun first date ideas: overthrow ur government w/ the bae
May 5, 2014
Feeling like a Bond.

Feeling like a Bond.

April 20, 2014

April 20, 2014

April 11, 2014
leftbyrightbydumb:

insanityisfree:

voluntaryist-brit:

rifleisfine:

slide-to-the-right:

Ah it’s back.

I will never not reblog this, because fuck Piers Morgan with a rusty spork.

Shut up and keep him. We dont want him back again!!!

Well, as a libertarian, I can’t advocate governments forcing him back, but uniform public ostracism is in order, wouldn’t you say?

Yes, yes I would say.

leftbyrightbydumb:

insanityisfree:

voluntaryist-brit:

rifleisfine:

slide-to-the-right:

Ah it’s back.

I will never not reblog this, because fuck Piers Morgan with a rusty spork.

Shut up and keep him. We dont want him back again!!!

Well, as a libertarian, I can’t advocate governments forcing him back, but uniform public ostracism is in order, wouldn’t you say?

Yes, yes I would say.

(Source: redstaterhetoric, via thetrevorpaul)

April 11, 2014
A Comprehensive List of Every Known Capability of the NSA

Thanks to the geniuses on Reddit for this list!

  • Collect the domestic meta-data of both parties in a phone-call. Source
  • Set up fake internet cafes to steal data. Source
  • Has intercepted the phone calls of at least 35 world leaders, including allies such as German Chancellor Angela Merkel.Source
  • Can tap into the underwater fiber-optic cables that carry a majority of the world’s internet traffic. Source
  • Tracks communications within media institutions such as Al Jazeera. Source
  • Has ‘bugged’ the United Nations headquarters. Source
  • Has set up a financial database to track international banking and credit card transactions. Source
  • Collects and stores over 200 million domestic and foreign text messages each day. Source
  • Collects and has real-time access to browsing history, email, and social media activity. To gain access, an analyst simply needs to fill out an on-screen form with a broad justification for the search that is not reviewed by any court or NSA personnel. Source
  • Creates maps of the social networks of United States citizens. Source
  • Has access to smartphone app data. Source
  • Uses spies in embassies to collect data, often by setting up ‘listening stations’ on the roofs of buildings. Source
  • Uses fake LinkedIn profiles and other doctored web pages to secretly install surveillance software in unwitting companies and individuals. Source
  • Tracks reservations at upscale hotels. Source
  • Has intercepted the talking-points of world leaders before meetings with Barack Obama. Source
  • Can crack encryption codes on cellphones. Source
  • Has implanted software on over 100,000 computers worldwide allowing them to hack data without internet connection, using radio waves. Source
  • Has access to computers through fake wireless connections. Source
  • Monitors communications in online games such as World of Warcraft. Source
  • Intercepts shipping deliveries and install back-door devices allowing access. Source
  • Has direct access to the data centers of Google, Yahoo and other major companies. Source
  • Covertly and overtly infiltrate United States and foreign IT industries to weaken or gain access to encryption, often by collaborating with software companies and internet service providers themselves. They are also, according to an internal document, “responsible for identifying, recruiting and running covert agents in the global telecommunications industry.”Source
  • The use of “honey traps”, luring targets into compromising positions using sex. Source
  • The sharing of raw intelligence data with Israel. Only official U.S. communications are affected, and there are no legal limits on the use of the data from Israel. Source
  • Spies on porn habits of activists to discredit them. Source
  • GCHQ intercepting random webcam images. Source
  • NSA tracks the location of 5 billion cellphones. Source
  • US intelligence chiefs have confirmed that the National Security Agency has used a “back door” in surveillance law to perform warrantless searches on Americans’ communications. Source

(Source: runningrepublican, via italianguy617)

April 11, 2014
leftbyrightbydumb:

policymic:

Here’s where your tax dollars are really going
Follow policymic

"International affairs”
You mean bombing people?

leftbyrightbydumb:

policymic:

Here’s where your tax dollars are really going

Follow policymic

"International affairs”

You mean bombing people?

(Source: micdotcom, via thetrevorpaul)

April 10, 2014

samssamulet:

the last one though lol

(Source: amroyounes, via jacksavadge)

April 9, 2014
thecivilwarparlor:

The Bayonet -Cold Steel
The Civil War Bayonet was nothing more than a sharpened piece of steel that infantrymen were issued. They would simply stick it on the muzzle of their rifles and off they go. It’s effectiveness was more psychological then physical.
Seeing a few thousand people running at you with large knives on the end of rifles could have a pretty frighting effect. However despite this only about 1% of Civil War casualties were actually a result of a bayonet wound.
Soldiers used the bayonet more often as an everyday tool around their camp rather than a weapon. There were a few instances where the bayonet made a prominent appearance. Such as during the Battle of Gettysburg when Union General Joshua Chamberlain ordered his men to fix bayonets and then charged down little round top completely routing the confederates there. These instances though were few and far between.
The use of “cold steel” to force the enemy to retreat was very successful in numerous small unit engagements at short range in the American Civil War, as most troops would retreat when charged while reloading (which could take up to a minute with loose powder even for trained troops). Although such charges inflicted few casualties, they often decided short engagements, and tactical possession of important defensive ground features. Additionally, bayonet drill could be used to rally men temporarily discomfited by enemy fire.
The Bloody Crucible of Courage: Fighting Methods and Combat Experience of the Civil War
http://www.civilwaracademy.com/civil-war-bayonet.html

thecivilwarparlor:

The Bayonet -Cold Steel

The Civil War Bayonet was nothing more than a sharpened piece of steel that infantrymen were issued. They would simply stick it on the muzzle of their rifles and off they go. It’s effectiveness was more psychological then physical.

Seeing a few thousand people running at you with large knives on the end of rifles could have a pretty frighting effect. However despite this only about 1% of Civil War casualties were actually a result of a bayonet wound.

Soldiers used the bayonet more often as an everyday tool around their camp rather than a weapon. There were a few instances where the bayonet made a prominent appearance. Such as during the Battle of Gettysburg when Union General Joshua Chamberlain ordered his men to fix bayonets and then charged down little round top completely routing the confederates there. These instances though were few and far between.

The use of “cold steel” to force the enemy to retreat was very successful in numerous small unit engagements at short range in the American Civil War, as most troops would retreat when charged while reloading (which could take up to a minute with loose powder even for trained troops). Although such charges inflicted few casualties, they often decided short engagements, and tactical possession of important defensive ground features. Additionally, bayonet drill could be used to rally men temporarily discomfited by enemy fire.

The Bloody Crucible of Courage: Fighting Methods and Combat Experience of the Civil War

http://www.civilwaracademy.com/civil-war-bayonet.html

April 9, 2014
thecivilwarparlor:

Post Civil War Lt. Henry O. Flipper’s Quest for Justice: 
"As Honorable A Record In The Army As Any Officer In It" In 1999, President Bill Clinton Issued Him A Full Pardon.
Born into slavery in Thomasville, Georgia, on March 21, 1856, Henry Ossian Flipper was appointed to the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, New York, in 1873. Over the next four years he overcame harassment, isolation, and insults to become West Point’s first African American graduate and the first African American commissioned officer in the regular U.S. Army. Flipper was stationed first at Fort Sill, Oklahoma, later served at Forts Elliott, Quitman, and Davis, Texas. He served as a signal officer and quartermaster, fought Apaches, installed telegraph lines, and supervised the building of roads. At Fort Sill, the young lieutenant directed the construction of a drainage system that helped prevent the spread of malaria. Still known as “Flipper’s Ditch,” the ditch is commemorated by a bronze marker at Fort Sill and the fort is listed as a National Historic Landmark.
In 1881, while serving at Fort Davis, Flipper’s commanding officer accused him of embezzling $3,791.77 from commissary funds. A court-martial found him not guilty of embezzlement but convicted him of conduct unbecoming an officer and ordered him dismissed from the Army.
After his dishonorable discharge, Flipper fought to clear his name as he pursued a career as an engineer and an expert on Spanish and Mexican land law. In 1898, a bill reinstating him into the Army and restoring his rank was introduced in Congress on his behalf. To bolster his case, he sent Congressman John A. T. Hull, chairman of the House Committee on Military Affairs, the letter displayed below along with a brief supporting the bill’s passage. Flipper’s letter to Hull is an eloquent statement asking Congress for “that justice which every American citizen has the right to ask.” The bill and several later ones were tabled, and Flipper died in 1940 without vindication, but in 1976, the Army granted him an honorable discharge, and in 1999, President Bill Clinton issued him a full pardon.
The National Archives and Records Administration is pleased to present these documents from the career of a man who served his country with honor and fought injustice tenaciously.
http://www.archives.gov/exhibits/featured_documents/henry_o_flipper/

thecivilwarparlor:

Post Civil War Lt. Henry O. Flipper’s Quest for Justice: 

"As Honorable A Record In The Army As Any Officer In It" In 1999, President Bill Clinton Issued Him A Full Pardon.

Born into slavery in Thomasville, Georgia, on March 21, 1856, Henry Ossian Flipper was appointed to the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, New York, in 1873. Over the next four years he overcame harassment, isolation, and insults to become West Point’s first African American graduate and the first African American commissioned officer in the regular U.S. Army. Flipper was stationed first at Fort Sill, Oklahoma, later served at Forts Elliott, Quitman, and Davis, Texas. He served as a signal officer and quartermaster, fought Apaches, installed telegraph lines, and supervised the building of roads. At Fort Sill, the young lieutenant directed the construction of a drainage system that helped prevent the spread of malaria. Still known as “Flipper’s Ditch,” the ditch is commemorated by a bronze marker at Fort Sill and the fort is listed as a National Historic Landmark.

In 1881, while serving at Fort Davis, Flipper’s commanding officer accused him of embezzling $3,791.77 from commissary funds. A court-martial found him not guilty of embezzlement but convicted him of conduct unbecoming an officer and ordered him dismissed from the Army.

After his dishonorable discharge, Flipper fought to clear his name as he pursued a career as an engineer and an expert on Spanish and Mexican land law. In 1898, a bill reinstating him into the Army and restoring his rank was introduced in Congress on his behalf. To bolster his case, he sent Congressman John A. T. Hull, chairman of the House Committee on Military Affairs, the letter displayed below along with a brief supporting the bill’s passage. Flipper’s letter to Hull is an eloquent statement asking Congress for “that justice which every American citizen has the right to ask.” The bill and several later ones were tabled, and Flipper died in 1940 without vindication, but in 1976, the Army granted him an honorable discharge, and in 1999, President Bill Clinton issued him a full pardon.

The National Archives and Records Administration is pleased to present these documents from the career of a man who served his country with honor and fought injustice tenaciously.

http://www.archives.gov/exhibits/featured_documents/henry_o_flipper/

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